Our Mission

Coding Workshops for Kids are passionate about introducing ‘computer programming’ to children to create empowered ‘coders’.

Computer science is for everyone! Anyone can learn if they want to, and we like to facilitate workshop style experiences for everyone to have fun and learn the power of coding.

Coding Workshops for Kids was started by a mum with two young kids, eager to introduce creative computing concepts to her own children but couldn’t find a workshop in her local area so she decided to set one up herself, and host coding sessions and make it accessible to the local community.

Why Code?

‘Digital fluency’ requires not just the ability to chat, browse, and interact but also the ability to design, create, and invent with new media. To do so, you need to learn some type of programming.

What are the benefits of programming?

Programming supports ‘computational thinking’ helping you learn important problem solving and design strategies such as modularisation and iterative design that carry over to non-programming domains.

Excerpt from Communication of the ACM | Nov 2009

CREATIVITY

PROBLEM SOLVING

STORYTELLING

Why Kids Should Learn to Code

Computer science is the new language of the world, and it’s also one of the fastest growing occupations. Almost every field of human endeavour relies more and more on software and software development for success – Simon Julian

Another benefit of teaching kids how to code is that it builds their confidence and creativity and provides the tools to create a world of limitless possibilities, where they can build their own paths and solutions in their own way.

SIMON JULIAN

Learning how to code is also going to help your children develop fluidity in their thinking. Coding is sequential – it’s telling a story, where you need to know what to write and why one thing follows the other in a particular order. Most programming languages designed for kids usually use games to teach them how to code, and this requires them to follow (or even better create) a story line or sequence as they play and code. – Simon Julian

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